Archive for the ‘Social’ Category

Tactics vs. Objectives and the End Game of Protesting the NFL

Friday, August 18th, 2017

by Gus Griffin

gus

 

 

 

 

CK

Colin Kaepernick refused to stand for the National Anthem to protest the unwarranted state-sponsored killings, primarily of Black men.

He did not protest for the right or even the privilege to continue to have a job as a professional football player.

This is obvious to most and an unnecessary reminder for some.  However, when one listens to this current discussion about protesting the NFL over the obvious blackballing of him, it’s clear that many are thinking about the two issues as one.

They are not the same thing.

At best, protesting the NFL will provide the pressure for Commissioner Roger Goodell to do what he should have already done and that would be to call in a favor from an owner to sign Kaepernick.  This would relieve the pressure and “protect the shield” from the bad optics this drama has created.  If that were to happen, all too many of those insisting on this protest, would then retreat to their normally unengaged lives.  Those in danger at the hands of the police by the mere virtue of their skin color will still be in the same danger.

A protest is a tactic and not an objective.  Kaepernick’s objective was to bring attention to the injustice of police brutality.  Therefore, if the tactic of protesting the NFL will not address the above noted objective, what would be the point?

Protest works best when tied to a larger movement.  The Montgomery Bus Boycott in 1955 was tied to the larger Civil Rights movement.  Curt Flood challenging baseball’s reserve clause, which basically declared that a player, even when not under contract, was controlled by one team for his entire career, was tied to the larger struggle for free agency for baseball players and professional athletes in general.

Colin Kaepernick will be fine, even if he doesn’t play another down in the NFL.  The cause he has courageously taken up will now allow him to pretty much name his price on the speaking circuit, should he choose to do so, all around the country.  In fact, a case could be made that Kaepernick would be even of greater value to the movement if he does not play another down in the NFL.  That would then make him a martyr of sorts and few things are more inspiring to get others to take action than martyrdom.

Protesting the NFL will do nothing to dismantle the police industrial complex which is at the core of the issue Kaepernick raises.  So to suggest that the failure to engage in this particular protest is being unsupportive of Kaepernick really shows a gross misunderstanding of the scope of the issue. The fact is, police brutality, especially against Black men, is and always has been a fundamental part of the American DNA, and who does or does not have a job in the NFL will not change that one iota.  To suggest otherwise would be the same as offering a band-aid to a cancer patient, as if it were a cure.

I would wager that Kaepernick himself would much rather see those of us committed to the issue of police brutality join organizations that have as their missions to address such or related issues.  It might be the NAACP or the ACLU.  Or if you are in the Washington DC area, it might be the Prince George’s People’s Coalition or Pan African Community Action, or in Jackson Mississippi there is Cooperate Jackson.  And if there is no organization that addresses the issue to your satisfaction, then start your own, but be prepared to be in it for the long haul. Drive by social media activists and/or platform pimps will not serve the movement well. As the late, great Kwame Ture (formerly Stokely Carmichael) often said, “The struggle is eternal.”

The seeds of the terrorism that claimed lives in Virginia this past weekend were sown long ago.  Likewise, the oppression Kaepernick seeks to address existed long before he became a professional football player and will not cease whether he is in or out of the NFL.

 

Gus Griffin, for War Room Sports

WHAT DOES IT TAKE?: Greg Hardy, the need for pictures, and what it says about America

Monday, November 9th, 2015

by Gus Griffin

gus

 

 

 

 

GH

I’m clear about Steven A. Smith’s  agenda: he caught a lotta flak after the Ray Rice abuse case and is now pandering to the very folks who wanted his head.
What is more useful is to discuss the threshold of proof necessary to acknowledge the mistreatment of some, particularly women, Black, and Latino folks.
On due process terms, it seems to me that only the Dallas Cowboys can take any action against Hardy and we all know that if they did cut him, more than a few teams will be lined up to sign him.  I’m clear that Greg Hardy is a bully and likely a psychopath. I would shed no tear if he never played in the league again. But I did not need to see pictures of his abuse to come to that line of thinking. The fact that anyone needed pictures to get to this level of outrage means that this is much bigger than Greg Hardy. This is about America and whose suffering is at the back of the line for addressing. It’s clear that women being brutalized by men and Black and Latino folks by police requires a certain level of visual proof beyond that of most others. In the Black man’s case, Eric Garner, sometimes even the picture isn’t enough. I’m not suggesting that alleged victims are all truthful. That “cry wolf” opportunist element is out there. But there is a distinct difference in justifiable scrutiny of the truth and hoping one is not being truthful so that we can maintain our business as usual world views about women, Black, and Latino folks being primarily responsible for their mistreatment. I say we because on the Greg Hardy issue, I am just as much of part of the problem. Certainly not for condoning violence against women but because Hardy’s arrogance and indifference is fueled by the very fundamental fact, be it conscious or subconscious, that he knows I and most of you will keep watching the NFL. Roger Goodell and Jerry Jones know it as well. So Ill climb down from my soapbox and hopefully “Screaming” A Smith will soon follow.
Gus Griffin, for War Room Sports

Riley Rebel: Champion Athlete for America, Misunderstood Victim of Racist Roots, and Supremacist Upbringing

Wednesday, October 21st, 2015

by B. Austin

BA

 

 

 

RC

It’s time to let “Riley Rebel”, champion of the Confederate Calvary of America, live in peace.  Time to stop judging him for shit we allow others to get away with, because it is less brash…not as overt.  I am absolutely certain his feelings are shared by many, many, many young white males from his background.  Personally, I prefer my racists and supremacists out in the open where I can see them and know their position.  I am not going to church, living near, or associating with Riley Rebel in anyway…so like white people have said for 100’s of years: “Run cracker run! Go run, jump, catch, hit, tackle, and entertain me with a football as you break your body apart for my entertainment”.

What BOTHERS ME THEN YOU ASK?  Well, I am glad you asked. What bothers me is the 7 or 8 other NBA owners that were Donald Sterling’s pals, which we will probably never know about.  What bothers me is the fact that the NFL, whose players are 72% black, have only 3 or 4 black head coaches, a few coordinators, the weakest player’s union, and NO BLACK MAJORITY OWNERS.  No, Riley Rebel doesn’t bother me much.  What bothered me was when 4 St. Louis Rams players decided to take a stand for justice regarding Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson, Police organizations and Policemen took a stand against that, and football fans didn’t rally or stand up against tyranny.  Nah, Riley Cooper didn’t bother me at all…he is entertaining.  I was much more concerned with the sports and athletic community’s lack of presence and silence in the #JusticeOrElse events.  Riley Cooper had no input there.  There are so many truly devious and heinous instances of white supremacy, racism, ethnocentrism, white privilege, white entitlement, Black apathy, Black colorism, self-hate, and overall societal erosion to point at, AND use sports as your landscape with which to do so.  Riley Cooper isn’t worth all the anger and ire he receives.  What Riley is to us and himself is a relatively slow, not-so-talented, overlooked, overpaid white professional athlete, who lives as a minority at his workplace and his true feelings came out on camera.  He probably faces an inferiority complex every day, and in the comfort and confines of his own territory, a Kenny Chesney concert filled with white country music fans (but secured by hulking Black security guards), Riley let that inferiority complex and alcohol get the best of him.  Here were guys that were bigger and stronger than him but making far less money and having far less status…and he was in front of his entourage…he had to let testosterone and frustration blend with the alcohol and racism, to go ahead and let his honest feelings be felt.  I actually feel sorry for dude. He has to live with this and public scorn for the remainder of his career, meanwhile America remains the same and the real problems go unsolved. He is merely an honest product of his environment.

 

B. Austin of War Room Sports

Melanin Mount Rushmore

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

by OGICIC

MMR

I’ll be honest, I’ve never participated in the “Kobe v. LeBron” or “Kobe v. MJ” debates and I’ve refrained for a simple reason. None of the aforementioned names come anywhere close to being the “greatest” in basketball. I love Floyd Mayweather and he has a success story which is filled with hard work and dedication, yet in still he can never be the “greatest”. I just watched the Super Bowl and was rooting for the Patriots, though after the victory I refused to engage in the “is Tom Brady the greatest?” discussion. Why? Because the greatest is named Jim Brown! The greatest in basketball are named Bill Russell & Kareem Abdul-Jabbar! The greatest boxer is named Muhammad Ali!

How do I define greatness, or the “greatest”? I define it by one’s performance on and off the field. To be the “greatest” means that you persevered through far more than anyone else, emerged victorious and uncompromised. How can Michael Jordan, or LeBron James, or Kobe Bryant be the “greatest”? I’ve never heard of MJ speaking up for the inner city youth that die for his shoes, much less the Chinese youth that make them. I appreciate LeBron’s speaking up on issues and his philanthropic efforts, but how does any of that exist without Bill Russell and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar? If we are to talk hardware, Bill Russell won 11 NBA championships and did so as both a player and coach in one of the most racially hostile cities in America (Boston). Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (aka Mr. Never White America’s Negro) won 6 NBA championships. If we are to talk about more than championships, Bill and Kareem have been avid advocates and spokespersons for Melanin/Hebrew/African-American people! They stood with boxing’s “greatest” Muhammad Ali, as he took on the racist and biased institution.

Jim Brown? Well he only won 1 NFL Championship, yet his fight of racism and injustice, his youth work and his constant advocacy have more diamonds in them than any ring!!!!

Thats how I define greatness……so sorry….MJ never has a chance, Kobe not even close, LeBron (I guess we can wait and see) can be 3rd at best! Brady, no way, Montana, never heard of him. Marshawn………heeeeyyyyy……..ask Jim about that one!

Zachariah Ysaye Oluwa Bankole “OGICIC”, for War Room Sports

The Magic of Symbols and the Perceptions of the Black Male

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

by Sheer Will

Will Blog

 

 

 

Symbols are very powerful.  They are magical gateways into our psyches and they can affect our subconscious in positive or negative ways.  They can take the form of words, sounds, gestures and visual images that convey ideas and beliefs. In Ancient Kemet (Egypt), symbols were used as languages and codes in the form of hieroglyphics that were for the esoteric benefit of the people. Today, symbols are still at work, but now they are reduced to no more than representations of conscious desires. For example, when you see the golden arches of McDonald’s, the mind conjures all of its representations at once; the Big Mac, Happy Meals, Ronald McDonald, etc., symbolic magic processed in the realm of human thought.

The magic of symbols have also been used to have harmful effects on groups of people, the black male in particular.  From “Birth of a Nation”, to co-opted Hip-Hop, to “For Colored Girls”, to “Black Plays” starring once-prominent actors and singers, the bombardment of degrading images of black males has reduced the psychological state of the viewer, desensitizing them to the humanness and greatness of black men.  No longer are there strong and powerful images of Muhammad Ali, the Black Panthers or Tommy Smith raising the black power fist in the 1968 Olympic Games.  With the help of subservient films like “The Butler”, “12 Years A Slave” and a few others, we have taken on the most passive and de-humanizing symbol of our struggle by laying on our backs saying, “I Can’t Breathe”.  The propaganda machine has done a great job in making Snuff films starring black males a normal and accepted occurrence and it’s only through our acquiescence that it continues.  Remember, Hitler made propaganda films (symbolic magic) to desensitize his country to the humanity of the Jews before he put them into ovens, so be mindful of what you allow into your subconscious.  You never know who is casting a spell on you.

Peace

Sheer Will of LegacyOfWrath.com, for War Room Sports

Mommy’s Son: Effeminate Sons and Whom to Blame

Friday, August 22nd, 2014

by Maggie Mangiel

Maggie Blog

 

 

 

MOther & Son

Who can forget that heart felt, tear-jerking, deep speech that had most of us staring at the ceiling a couple of months back? I’m talking about that Kevin Durant MVP speech in which he thanked his mother and called her “the real MVP”.  In many Black households, the mother is the alpha and the omega.  The father and the mother.  She is the first to wake and the last to go to bed.  A strong mother who does all is nothing new in the Black community.  She is celebrated and in some instances, unappreciated.  Yes, unappreciated and even blamed for the misfortunes of her offsprings.  One of the worst cases is this despicable video being circulated on Facebook (Video at the bottom of the page). I came across the video a few weeks back and it left me outraged, but thought to let it go.  Then it showed up a few more times on my newsfeed, and I decided to say something about it.  In summary, the 7:02 minutes long video entitled, “Black Mother and Effeminate Black Sons”, stated that most black gay men become so due to the influence of a strong “masculine and overweight” single mother.  If a black man was present in the household the result would be a heterosexual son.  In The video we see a woman talking to her son about rape and the videographer says, “R-A-P-E…WTF?!!… As a result, some of them reject their masculinity altogether and embrace femininity”.  Really?!!!  Raping women makes one a straight man?  How is teaching a son how to respect women emasculating? The video doesn’t stop there, as it continues to showcase many youngsters dancing and singing along to Beyonce and Rihanna, as further proof of the numerous gay youngsters, in an effort to add credibility to the point. In summation, the video states that homosexuality is a learned behaviour taught by the single and over-weight black mothers, with overbearing attitudes.

This whole topic had me thinking about this other related notion that I keep seeing and reading about.  The notion that the media is emasculating the black man by putting black actors in dresses, with that movement being led by none other than Tyler Perry and Madea.  Does seeing RuPaul in drag make a straight black man turn gay?  Research has shown that homosexuality in males is partly genetic, with environmental and social factors playing part in determining sexuality; meaning a person can be born with a gay gene. However, who they are sexually attracted to is a whole different story.  In other words, biological male homosexuals’ choice of mates is largely influenced by their surroundings.  So in some ways, the maker of the video is right; nurture does play a role, but what about all of those strong successful heterosexual black males who come from a single parent home (usually a mother since she is always the one left to take care of the child when a deadbeat father vanishes without a trace).  What about those gay sons like Magic Johnson’s and Cookie’s son “EJ”, who comes from a two-parent household? How does one explain their existence? The research on the issue of nature vs. nurture is unclear, and the author’s claim about single black mothers is even more equivocal, but since the research shows that social factors are definitely in play, isn’t the absence of a father more problematic than having a strong, over-bearing mother?

BLACK-MOTHER-AND-BABY-ON-COMPUTER-facebook

So in making this the fault of the over-weight, single black mother, why aren’t we addressing the elephant in the room?  Where is the black father?  Why let this woman birth these children, carry the burden of caring and providing for them, and then expect her to turn around and also teach them how to be men?  How does a woman teach her son how to be a man?  Why isn’t the absent black man taking responsibility for his duty as a father?  These, the same men, who can’t be bothered to be fathers, are the same ones making such videos and denouncing the Single Black Mother.  Why doesn’t the maker of the video call for a strong black household and family unit?  Why blame the person who is doing the best they can against all odds?  Are some black men so mad at black women for birthing them that instead of lending them a hand, they kick them while they are down? The problem is not the strong no nonsense black mother; the problem is the absence of a FATHER!!!!! Don’t want a dysfunctional son, don’t be an absent father.

 

Maggie Mangiel of Body on Track, for War Room Sports

The Power of Weed

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

by Joe Davis

Joe davis

 

 

 

 

Browns WR Josh Gordon (Image via eurweb.com)

Browns WR Josh Gordon
(Image via eurweb.com)

I don’t smoke weed.  I have only tried it once in my life so maybe I’m lost.  But can someone please explain to me why people are defending Josh Gordon?  He is a repeat violator of the NFL drug policy.  A policy that many former and current players have said that it’s very easy to pass. Josh Gordon has top 5 wide receiver talent.  He has bottom 5 sense.  He has been suspended from the NFL already.  He was kicked out of Baylor University for testing positive for marijuana in July of 2011, after being suspended for marijuana use during the 2010 season.  He transferred to Utah and sat out before entering the NFL thru the supplemental draft (some reports even say that he failed drug tests at Utah).  In 2013 he was suspended for the first two games of the season because he failed the drug test.  And now he is possibly gonna miss the entire season because he failed the drug test AGAIN! REALLY?!?!?!

(Image via HelpingHandsDispensary)

(Image via HelpingHandsDispensary)

I am not gonna argue about whether weed is or isn’t a drug.  I’m not even gonna debate the people that will talk about how marijuana is being decriminalized by many states in our great country.  Here is my point. If your job says don’t use a substance then don’t do it. ESPECIALLY if they test for it.  There are hundreds of thousands of people that also are subject to random drug tests; and they aren’t making $825,604 this year.  THAT IS $51,600.25 PER GAME. I make a little more than that in a year, but if my job said stop drinking coffee (something I drink 6 days a week), I would quit that shit in a heartbeat.  So I don’t get how someone would blow this opportunity to set themselves and their family up for a lifetime.  And to defend this man seems to be the problem.  He’s under contract.  He’s got a talent that many would kill for.  He has been given a 2nd, 3rd and now 4th chance.

In a famous skit on Chappelle Show, Rick James said “Cocaine is a helluva drug!”  But how powerful is weed?  Let’s not defend bad behavior.  Josh Gordon needs a wake-up call before he’s on the list of “could have been” or “should have been” players.  Josh Gordon needs one of his buddies to tell him that he can still be his boy but leave the “wacky tobaccy” alone.  Josh even needs to get away if his friends are smoking, since he said that his last positive test comes from second-hand smoke. I guess the power of weed is stronger than many will give it credit for.

 

Joe Davis of Sideline to Sideline, for War Room Sports

Don’t be a Hater: Gossip and its Effects on Health

Sunday, July 27th, 2014

by Maggie Mangiel

Maggie Blog

 

 

 

Whispering3

What is it about women and gossip?  As soon as we hit puberty we enjoy this “epic” female-kind pastime.  Just a bunch of women without a care in the world, trading negative talk about others while giggling and enjoying themselves to no end.  But is it harmless fun? Or is there more to gossip than just talk and giggles?

We all know that bullying is wrong and can lead to some serious consequences such as death, but when we take the two genders and compare them, we find that women (girls) prefer the more covert form; emotional as opposed to physical.  Emotional bullying takes the form of rumors and gossip spreads by those the victim consider friends and acquaintances, or those dubbed by pop culture as “haters”, and the instigator is usually someone very close to the victim. So the question I was asked was: “can haters and their gossip affect one’s health?” Well you bet your ass they can!  Elaine from Seinfeld once said, “boys would give each other a wedgie, and girls will tease someone till they develop an eating disorder”.  Bullying by females is so hard to detect, therefore hard to combat, which makes its effects even more severe. But what is it that compels women to gossip, is it biology or how we’re brought up?  What makes us the judge of others’ lives and their choices, and deem them unacceptable? Well I think the answer to that could be a long dissertation by some psychology/sociology grad student…it’s way above my pay grade.  However, a point that is worth noting is that female aggression is closely related to abuse and trauma suffered at home, so in this case the perpetrator is also a victim, and nurture obviously plays a big role here.

gossip_450x200Women tend to employ passive aggressive behavior in their attacks, unlike men who would use a fist to solve their problems, so we could call that biology then.  They would form a clique of friends a là the movie Mean Girls, and torment their victim by way of spreading vicious rumors that would eventually lead to the destructions of the reputation of their “frenemy”.  They would feel a sense of superiority over their “subject” and set out to “out” her “bad behavior” to the masses. They truly believe that they are in the right, so can we blame some kind of mental disorder here? It is safe to say that the aggressors might suffer from negative self-concept, body image issues, and poor relationships ties (Canadian Mental Health, 2009). The victim, of course, is not getting away without a scratch here (meow, no pun intended).  She might fall into depression, develop eating disorders, her relationships will deteriorate, and in some worse but real instances, take her own life.  Yeah this is some serious stuff, so gossiping is not so harmless after all is it?

So what can we do to eliminate this kind of ill behavior?  First, remove yourself.  If you find yourself participating in this is sort of thing, stop and repeat this; “happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony.”- Mahatma Gandhi.  Be mindful of what you say.  Your words can be deadly.  Gossiping can rob you of your own happiness, not to mention, destroy another’s life. Try to address the underlying emotional issues that compel you to do this.  Research has shown that most women who participate in gossip are victims of abuse, whether as children at the hands of their parents or as adults in unhealthy romantic relationships. (Canadian Mental Health 2009).  You are the solution.  If you see your friends/family take part in this, be vocal! Call them out on it! Educate them! Let them know how dangerous this behavior is. Hell, start an intervention if you must.  Friends don’t let friends gossip!  Assess the connection that you have with said person and see if you can build and better that relationship.  They might be hurt, suffering, or feeling neglected and that why they are resorting to this behavior.  Also find better things to do.  Engage in new hobbies, maybe even join a gym (yep you knew that fitness plug was coming, didn’t you?)

If for whatever reason beyond your control, you have to gossip, well then why don’t you engage in positive gossip?  Compliment someone in their absence, whether by stating what wonderful act they have committed, how beautiful they are, or how their mere company delights you, and remember, “strong minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, and weak mind discuss people”.  Don’t be weak-minded!!!

 

Maggie Mangiel of Body on Track, for War Room Sports

Dr. Combs

Monday, May 12th, 2014

by Writing Battle Rap History

Writing Battle Rap History Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sean "P. Diddy" Combs

Sean “P. Diddy” Combs

Dr. Sean Combs, also known as “P.Diddy,” “Puff Daddy”, and “Big Homie,” among other names, had the honor of gracing the 2014 graduates of Howard University with the 146th Commencement Speech.  He was honored by the university for the degree of Doctor of Humanities.  There was quite a bit of controversy surrounding him being selected since he is a college dropout, and let’s be honest, because of who he is.

Combs is in no way refined in the pursuit of his ambitions, nor does he exercise subtlety in flaunting his riches.  Every thing he does is big.  I’m sorry – everything he does is grandiose; larger than life.  Combs has no chill button and that kind of personality makes some people uncomfortable, especially someone who isn’t the most polished piece of silverware in the bunch.

Howard University has had a rough year financially.  Former president, Sidney A. Ribeau suddenly stepped down last December after the university’s enrollment and credit score fell significantly under his leadership.  The Howard board of trustees appointed interim president, Wayne A.I. Frederick in Ribeau’s place.  The university announcing Combs as the commencement speaker in April was one of Frederick’s  decisions that pumped new life into the school.

Combs as the key note speaker is a sign of the times and a paradigm shift for colleges on who they deem worthy for the position.  Combs amassed his $700 million dollar fortune in an unconventional way, mostly through Hip-Hop.  And though many of us love Hip-Hop, we love it when its in its place – rooted in it’s foundational elements, not when a genre that is still considered parvenu is being honored for its scholastic achievements.

Notwithstanding the backlash, Combs gave a memorable speech.  He seemed a little out of his element and at times overly expressive in his gratitude, but that’s probably because he sincerely wanted to be accepted from the students and faculty as an honorable collegiate.

What I appreciated most about the speech was that it wasn’t coated with fancy language or presented like an essay, it was just straight talk in a way that only Diddy could deliver it.  Wrapping up his speech, Combs profoundly details his early days at Uptown Records, when then founder, Andre Harrell fired a young Combs because he got too cocky.  He was left without a job, an 8 1/2 month pregnant girlfriend, and a new home he purchased in Scarsdale, New York that he couldn’t afford.  Click here to read the full article.

 

The Sterling Affair

Monday, April 28th, 2014

by B. Austin

Brad Blog

 

 

 

 

 

(Photo via BuschLeagueSports.com)

(Photo via BuschLeagueSports.com)

If people caught the conversations inside “the locker room of War Room Sports”, we would be banned, jailed, lynched, hung at the stake, and neutered.  My point being, as human beings we all can be insensitive in our conversations about other human beings.  Our prejudices can and do at times rear their ugly heads.  However, a consistent pattern of behavior towards others with certain malicious undertones indicates something more than prejudice or general ignorance.  Donald Sterling is the personification of something a little more heinous, and a line of thinking that has gone unchecked for far too long.

Through my travels on the world wide Web and interactions with the “internets”, there are a couple points I am putting out there in conversations regarding “The Donald Sterling Affair”: 1) We as black people ARE irate, as we should be, but we should remember it is not illegal to be racist.  It is not illegal to express racist beliefs.  Power behind any belief in this country comes from economic viability, exposure to to a mass audience, and support from that audience.  We have all supported Donald Sterling.  How you might ask?  By and large, passive inaction.  He has a history of this behavior that has gone unchecked and ignored.  He was already awarded an NAACP image award and was going to win a lifetime achievement award next month.  Due diligence was not done by us, or even more frightening,  was ignored as insignificant.  2) This point I will state facts and ask a question.  Donald Sterling purchased the Clippers for roughly $15 million.  They are presently worth $770MM.  When an owner or ownership team is selected and awarded a team by the league and the committee of other owners, VAST amounts of due diligence is done because that owner now represents the other owners and a larger global brand, with an audience of billions.  Even 30 years ago, due diligence was fairly stringent with David Stern.  Do you think the owners and NBA administration were not aware?  What is their culpability in this?  3) America turns a blind and cowardly eye to her current pathologies born from her past transgressions and trauma.  This perpetuates cowardice and weak character because we don’t inject responsibility, accountability,  and acknowledgement into our discussions about race, where we are, where we’ve been, and what is going on now.  4) Black people (and others); stop chastising and criticizing these players for not risking their financial livelihood by boycotting.  The vacuum in Black leadership can be blamed for their lack of “lay it on the line, John Carlos-like” actions.  They took adequate steps and may continue to protest.  At the end of the day, on any pro sports team, you play for the money, the love of the game, your teammates, your coach, and the fans…not ownership.  To expect them to risk $62 million (or any percentage of that salary number) is unfair.  If they did boycott, it would have been noble, honorable, and a beautiful thing, but not necessarily smart, as it would give Sterling an “out” of “non-performance” in any later legal proceedings or arbitration in an attempt to relieve him of ownership.  5) America; stop being so shocked and surprised at these racist feelings and circumstances rearing their ugly heads. We have not come that far and quite honestly we may have regressed due to societal and cultural declines in recent years.  Not to mention these are older white men who control and operate the socio-economic engines.  They grew up in the 40s, 50s, 60s.  They are direct descendants and/or participants in Jim Crow’s sons’ and grandsons’ views.  6) What is a 20-something woman of Black and Mexican decent doing dating Donald Sterling?  Does this remind you of the slave master’s relationship with Black female slaves?  He can hate pieces of you but exploit the things he wants?  7) Ultimately the true response and changing of the societal tides lie with the people, the fans. The players, the owners, etc are major stakeholders but nowhere near as powerful as the fan.  In today’s society where the culture of immediacy and sensationalism is prevalent,  how long will this remain an issue that the people are committed to?  WHAT WILL YOU DO?  NOT ANYONE ELSE.  Fight their power, become better people, and this goes away in generations and centuries.

Click here to watch the War Room Sports roundtable discussion on “The Sterling Affair”.

 

B. Austin of The War Room, for War Room Sports